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ASARCO photos 1948-1990
Date: 2/3/2009 Album ID: 453964
Photos by EPT Library
Pages: 1 2 3
ASARCO
May 15, 1970 - EXPRESSING THEIR FEELINGS -- Employees from the ASARCO smelter were very much in attendance Thursday at the Texas Air Control Board session in Liberty Hall to consider extension of its current order regulating sulfur dioxide emission from the El Paso plant of American Smelting and Refining Co. The audiences of employees and interested residents of El paso and vicinity was an orderly gathering, bursting with applause from time to time in support of a presentation, question or answer.
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November 26, 1975 - AIR POLLUTION PROBLEMS -- Asarco Inc. has been having trouble living up to sulfur dioxide emission standards it accepted as part of a May 14 district court agreement. (Times Staff Photo by John Costello)
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UNDATED ASARCO PHOTO
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January 23, 1980 - TWO WORKERS LOOK OVER THE NORTHERN SECTION OF COLLAPSED PIPE TUESDAY (Times staff photo by Luis Villalobos)
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MAY 1980 - ASARCO DANGER SIGN
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July 16, 1980 - A CLEAR VIEW -- The sun filters through billowing clouds, silhouetting the giant smokestacks at the Asarco plant on the West Side. El Paso's air has less pollution because Asarco is shut down, an Air Quality Control official said Tuesday. About 1,350 Asarco and Phelps Dodge employees are part of the 39,000 copper workers nationwide who went on strike July 1 because of a cost-of-living dispute.
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December 13, 1948 - NERVE CENTER -- A giant control board, registering the operations inl vital parts of the slag fuming plaMT at the Upper Valley smelter, provides the key to the plant drawing zinc oxide from the slag heaps. Where a moment's carelessness could shut down the entire plant, much of the responsibility for its performance rests with the man on duty at the control room.
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September 14, 1971 - CONVERSION PLANT OPENS -- The $1.7 million pilot plant to test a new process that converts sulphur dioxide in smelter gases into elemental sulphur goes onstream Tuesday at the American Smelting and Refining Co. smelter. It uses a process developed at ASARCO's New Jersey laboratories and both ASARCO and Phelps Dodge Corp. are sharing the cost of the joint venture. In addition, the two companies have budgeted $800,000 for starting up the plant and for a year's operation. It is designed to produce up to 20 tons of sulphur daily.
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May 19, 1973 - DEDICATE PLANT -- The new $18.5 million ASARCO plant to convert sulfur dioxide was formally dedicated Friday by local officials and representatives of ASARCO in ceremonies at the El Paso smelter. Operation of the unit materially reduces the plume and sulfur dioxide emissions for the smelter's tall stack.
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June 6, 1971  BLOWING ITS STACK  A 400-foot chimney which has been standing at the American Smelting and Refining Co. for 54 years slowly sinks to the ground Saturday after demolitions placed around the base were exploded. The chimney was brought down to make room for an $18.5 million plant designed to extract sulfur dioxide from the emissions of the smelting plant, turning it into sulfuric acid at the rate of about 450 tons per day. ASARCO is also building a $2.5 million experimental pilot plant in El Paso to test another method of ridding the air of the sulfur dioxide emissions. (Times Photo by David Dyer)
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June 6, 1971  BLOWING ITS STACK  A 400-foot chimney which has been standing at the American Smelting and Refining Co. for 54 years slowly sinks to the ground Saturday after demolitions placed around the base were exploded. The chimney was brought down to make room for an $18.5 million plant designed to extract sulfur dioxide from the emissions of the smelting plant, turning it into sulfuric acid at the rate of about 450 tons per day. ASARCO is also building a $2.5 million experimental pilot plant in El Paso to test another method of ridding the air of the sulfur dioxide emissions. (Times Photo by David Dyer)
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June 6, 1971  BLOWING ITS STACK  A 400-foot chimney which has been standing at the American Smelting and Refining Co. for 54 years slowly sinks to the ground Saturday after demolitions placed around the base were exploded. The chimney was brought down to make room for an $18.5 million plant designed to extract sulfur dioxide from the emissions of the smelting plant, turning it into sulfuric acid at the rate of about 450 tons per day. ASARCO is also building a $2.5 million experimental pilot plant in El Paso to test another method of ridding the air of the sulfur dioxide emissions. (Times Photo by David Dyer)
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May 1980 - Ores and concentrates, formerly stored in the open and frequently airborne during windy conditions, are now stored in an enclosed building equivalent in area to the size of three football fields. The building has 14 bedding bins with a total capacity of approximately 80,000 tons. The exhaust air is filtered through baghouses, before discharge to the atmosphere.
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March 2, 1994 - A fire in an empty diesel storage tank Tuesday morning at Asarco that sent up a black cloud of smoke visible over much of El Paso caused only minor damage and no injuries, plant officials said. A contractor was dismantling the inactive storage tank with an acetylne torch when the fire started. (Victor Calzada / El Paso Times)
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UNDATED - W. R. Kelly, SECOND FROM LEFT
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December 27, 1986 - Environmental scientist Jim Rice says the smokestack can suck the hard hat right off your head. (Times photo by Rudy Gutierrez)
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February 3, 1972 - PLANT UNDER WAY -- W. R. Kelly, right, superintendent of American Smelting & Refining Col, and Joe W. English, project engineer for the company, Wednesday led newsmen through a tour of the new air control plant that will cost $18.5 million and produce more than 450 tons of sulphuric acid daily. They are shown at a site where framework is under construction for tanks to be used in gathering the acid. The plant is scheduled to be onstream this December, after which there will be very little smoke coming from the stacks and all objectionable particles will be removed.
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December 27, 1986 - The Asarco smokestack has been a landmark for pilots since it was completed in 1966. It is the tallest smokestack in Texas.
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